Turf N Surf :: SURFING IN IRELAND Images

Turf N Surf :: SURFING IN IRELAND

Bundoran is about halfway between Rossnowlagh and Easky which is about 30 miles as the crow files, but because this is Ireland, it’s about three times that distance of coastline. There are a dozen known setups either side of Bundoran, and all within range of surfers from beginners to hellmen.

The Peak is the center attraction of Bundoran, a classic rivermouth reef that goes both ways with equal quality – not that there’s anything wrong with that. Catch the Peak on a big day with offshore winds and you will find yourself at the pub, babbling about “a cold water Macaronis.”

To the north of Bundoran, Tullan Strand is a stretch of beachbreaks with lots of room for everyone from beginners to pros. When the winds are offshore along here, which they often are, Tullan fires A frames from one end to the other. This is where the surf school goes, as there is plenty of room, a sand bottom and usually gentle surf on the inside.

Farther north, Rossnowlagh is another stretch of beach between a jetty and a point. Rossnowlagh beach is also popular with beginners, and it’s hard to imagine a more picturesque place to learn how to surf.

Traveling southwest of Bundoran, Streedagh is yet another long strand of golden beach, backed by the green mountains of Eire. Depending on wind, swell and tide, this is a perfect place for beginners, or a perfect place to get shacked.

A little farther to the southeast, Mullaghmore is a bay that is infamous in Irish history and a place that is becoming famous in the surfing world as the Irish version of Mavericks. When the ocean is in full roar, Mullaghmore is a giant left capable of delivering XXL bombs. When it’s smaller, Mullaghmore is a wide beachbreak in front of the harbor - another place that is perfect for average surfers.

Crossing into County Sligo there is another half dozen surfing areas, with Easky being the centerpiece. This area is ringed with right and left points and reefs to numerous to mention, overlooked by towers built to watch for marauding Vikings.

So maraud.