Surf Seasons & Weather

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Ireland lies between 51° and 55° north, which is the equivalent of the Queen Charlotte Islands on the west coast of North America, and Newfoundland on the east coast of North America.  Irish weather is northern hemisphere weather but stronger than most North Americans are used to: The winters are harsher, the summers are greener. And fall? Yahoo.

Ireland has four very distinct seasons and two of them are the best for surf. The North Atlantic produces a constant rumble of swell from September to April, but winter months of November through February is generally just too big, cold, windy and gnarly for a lot of people. Summers are warmer and green, but also mostly flat. The Irish spring from March through May is on the cusp between winter and summer, when the weather is easing up but the ocean is still bubbling swell. September and October is Fall and most agree the best time for surfing in Ireland when the weather can still be warm, swell is coming down from the north and up from the south, and the hurricanes off the Southeast coast of North America push warm water up along the west coast of Ireland.

Ireland gets a lot of weather and on any given day throughout the year you will likely hear the weatherman predict sunny skies with rain showers variable winds and mild temperatures with the possibility of a cold front moving through. Air temperatures in Winter and Spring will range from 30 to 60 degrees with water temps in the high 50’s to low 60’s.  Summer and Fall air temperatures are much more mild reaching up into the mid to even high 70’s.  The big surprise is that the water temperatures in September/October can reach up into the high 60’s or even 70 degrees.